http://kenafsociety.org/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 01:05:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 Social norms influence both the political and economic performance of a country. Behavior always matters http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-influence-both-the-political-and-economic-performance-of-a-country-behavior-always-matters/ http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-influence-both-the-political-and-economic-performance-of-a-country-behavior-always-matters/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 20:50:34 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-influence-both-the-political-and-economic-performance-of-a-country-behavior-always-matters/

It is a pleasant experience to be surrounded by friendly people. But what is the probability that we will run into some nice people? A study carried out in a sample of 31 countries, including India, by Dutch academic Niels Van Doesum and his associates yielded interesting results. Top Japanese by showing small acts of kindness, described as mindfulness. The Indians came in third from the bottom, followed by Turkey and Indonesia. Mindfulness is a manifestation of a broader awareness of those around him. This seemingly insignificant thing feeds into the larger foundation of how societies are structured.

A large body of social science research has shown that culture and norms greatly influence not only the political structure of nations, but also economic performance. In politics, the most striking example is the United Kingdom. More than eight centuries after the creation of the Magna Carta, it still does not have a codified constitution. Norms are the invisible bonds that hold the political structure in place. Social norms, the implicit rules of a society regarding traits such as honesty and work ethics, have a huge influence on economic development. This is one of the reasons why blindly copying “best practices” produces mixed results.

Standards are not permanent. Over time, they change. Many economic successes after World War II were shaped by changing standards as much as by good economic policies. The norms that engender trust among the constituents of a society significantly influence both economic policies and general laws. A society with a higher level of trust operates with a light economic regulatory structure and largely avoids repressive laws. In this context, it is relevant that before Adam Smith proposed The wealth of nations who provided insight into the role of self-interest in a market economy, he wrote The theory of moral feelings, which relied on human sympathy.

The study of mindfulness is insightful because it studies behavior when it is not influenced by incentives or disincentives. It’s the friendliness quotient in people. Who doesn’t want to live in a society with a high kindness quotient? It also comes with the added benefit of better economic performance.



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This article was published as an editorial opinion in the print edition of The Times of India.



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Camila Cabello says her “Cinderella” defies social norms http://kenafsociety.org/camila-cabello-says-her-cinderella-defies-social-norms/ http://kenafsociety.org/camila-cabello-says-her-cinderella-defies-social-norms/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 12:17:30 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/camila-cabello-says-her-cinderella-defies-social-norms/

Watch: Camila Cabello and Idina Menzel on Modernization Cinderella

Camila Cabello says her new approach Cinderella “Challenges social programming” caused by other fairy tales.

The 24-year-old singer makes her acting debut in the film directed by Perfect writer Kay Cannon, and describes the story as a “trauma-informed fairy tale.”

Her version of Cinderella is less interested in wooing the prince than she is in pursuing a dream of selling her dresses in the town square, despite rules preventing women from owning their own businesses.

Read more: Keira Knightley banned her daughter from two Disney movies

“I think this movie really challenges social programming, what I feel as I get older I’m starting to understand too,” Cabello told Yahoo Entertainment UK.

Camila Cabello and director Kay Cannon describe Cinderella as a talented seamstress. (Kerry Brown / Amazon)

She adds, “So many of those stereotypes that you see in older fairy tales and also cultural norms and social programming in general. Back then, it was normal for women not to have a job. and not having their own dreams.

“People looked at this character like she had three heads when she said ‘I want to sell dresses and I have ambition’.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 12: Camila Cabello performs live at Brixton Academy on June 12, 2018 in London, England.  (Photo by Samir Hussein / Redferns)

LCamila Cabello in concert at the Brixton Academy, 2018 (Samir Hussein / Redferns)

“They were just like, ‘What are you talking about? You’re acting like a fool.’ She disputes that.”

Cabello says she was also intrigued by the adjustments to the character of Cinderella’s stepmother, who she said was “played beautifully” by Frozen and Broadway star Idina Menzel.

Read more: Idina Menzel discusses the possibility of Frozen 3

“It’s hard to wonder if she’s mean or is she struggling and really in pain? Let’s get her into therapy,” Cabello told her co-star.

“I love this description of a trauma-informed society. It’s like a trauma-informed fairy tale.

“And I feel like that also reflects on the set of women who support each other and women who encourage each other and are really aware. Kay was like that, you’re like that and it’s kind of like that. dream experience for a woman and for everyone. “

Idina Menzel plays Cinderella's stepmother in the new musical adaptation.  (Kerry Brown / Amazon)

Idina Menzel plays Cinderella’s stepmother in the new musical adaptation. (Kerry Brown / Amazon)

Menzel says it was interesting to add “nuances” to the portrayal of a character who almost always has “Evil” or “Wicked” added to the beginning of their name.

The veteran artist says there was a “real camaraderie” between everyone on set.

Read more: Idina Menzel jokes that Travolta owes her a favor after a false name

“Even though our film is older, it plays for today,” adds Menzel.

“Maybe we are not necessarily forced to get married, but there are still so many people who want to be understood and seen for who they are and are still being oppressed that way.”

Camila Cabello plays a very different Cinderella in Kay Cannon's new reimagining of the classic fairy tale.  (Christophe Raphaël / Amazon)

Camila Cabello plays a very different Cinderella in Kay Cannon’s new reimagining of the classic fairy tale. (Christophe Raphaël / Amazon)

Cinderella features a combination of original music and covers of pop classics, including Queen’s Someone to love, Ed Sheeran Perfect and that of Madonna Materialistic girl.

The all-star cast includes Pierce Brosnan, Minnie Driver, James Corden, Romesh Ranganathan, Rob Beckett and Romesh Ranganathan, with Nicholas Galitzine as prince.

Read more: Disney princesses reimagined as black femme fatales

Billy Porter, meanwhile, delivers a stunning performance as a genderless version of the Fairy Godmother character.

Cinderella is available to stream through Amazon Prime Video starting September 3.

Watch: Amazon Adaptation Trailer Cinderella


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Camila Cabello says her “Cinderella” defies social norms http://kenafsociety.org/camila-cabello-says-her-cinderella-defies-social-norms-2/ http://kenafsociety.org/camila-cabello-says-her-cinderella-defies-social-norms-2/#respond Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/camila-cabello-says-her-cinderella-defies-social-norms-2/

Watch: Camila Cabello and Idina Menzel on Modernization Cinderella

Camila Cabello says her new approach Cinderella “Challenges social programming” caused by other fairy tales.

The 24-year-old singer makes her acting debut in the film directed by Perfect writer Kay Cannon, and describes the story as a “trauma-informed fairy tale.”

Her version of Cinderella is less interested in wooing the prince than she is in pursuing a dream of selling her dresses in the town square, despite rules preventing women from owning their own businesses.

Read more: Keira Knightley banned her daughter from two Disney films

“I think this movie really challenges social programming, what I feel as I get older I’m starting to understand too,” Cabello told Yahoo Entertainment UK.

Camila Cabello and director Kay Cannon describe Cinderella as a talented seamstress. (Kerry Brown / Amazon)

She adds, “So many of those stereotypes that you see in older fairy tales and also cultural norms and social programming in general. Back then, it was normal for women not to have a job. and not having their own dreams.

“People looked at this character like she had three heads when she said ‘I want to sell dresses and I have ambition’.

LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 12: Camila Cabello performs live at Brixton Academy on June 12, 2018 in London, England.  (Photo by Samir Hussein / Redferns)

LCamila Cabello in concert at the Brixton Academy, 2018 (Samir Hussein / Redferns)

“They were just like, ‘What are you talking about? You’re acting like a fool.’ She disputes that.”

Cabello says she was also intrigued by the adjustments to the character of Cinderella’s stepmother, who she said was “played beautifully” by Frozen and Broadway star Idina Menzel.

Read more: Idina Menzel discusses the possibility of Frozen 3

“It’s hard to wonder if she’s mean or is she struggling and really in pain? Let’s get her into therapy,” Cabello told her co-star.

“I love this description of a trauma-informed society. It’s like a trauma-informed fairy tale.

“And I feel like that also reflects on the set of women who support each other and women who encourage each other and are really aware. Kay was like that, you’re like that and it’s kind of like that. dream experience for a woman and for everyone. “

Idina Menzel plays Cinderella's stepmother in the new musical adaptation.  (Kerry Brown / Amazon)

Idina Menzel plays Cinderella’s stepmother in the new musical adaptation. (Kerry Brown / Amazon)

Menzel says it was interesting to add “nuances” to the portrayal of a character who almost always has “Evil” or “Wicked” added to the beginning of their name.

The veteran artist says there was a “real camaraderie” between everyone on set.

Read more: Idina Menzel jokes that Travolta owes her a favor after a false name

“Even though our film is older, it plays for today,” adds Menzel.

“Maybe we are not necessarily forced to get married, but there are still so many people who want to be understood and seen for who they are and are still being oppressed that way.”

Camila Cabello plays a very different Cinderella in Kay Cannon's new reimagining of the classic fairy tale.  (Christophe Raphaël / Amazon)

Camila Cabello plays a very different Cinderella in Kay Cannon’s new reimagining of the classic fairy tale. (Christophe Raphaël / Amazon)

Cinderella features a combination of original music and covers of pop classics, including Queen’s Someone to love, Ed Sheeran Perfect and that of Madonna Materialistic girl.

The all-star cast includes Pierce Brosnan, Minnie Driver, James Corden, Romesh Ranganathan, Rob Beckett and Romesh Ranganathan, with Nicholas Galitzine as prince.

Read more: Disney princesses reimagined as black femme fatales

Billy Porter, meanwhile, delivers a stunning performance as a genderless version of the Fairy Godmother character.

Cinderella is available to stream through Amazon Prime Video starting September 3.

Watch: Amazon Adaptation Trailer Cinderella


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Social norms and levels of risk: the psychology behind wearing a mask http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-and-levels-of-risk-the-psychology-behind-wearing-a-mask/ http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-and-levels-of-risk-the-psychology-behind-wearing-a-mask/#respond Fri, 20 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-and-levels-of-risk-the-psychology-behind-wearing-a-mask/

Even though the Delta variant is spreading in Ohio, the wearing of the mask remains to a large extent recommended but not obligatory.

Jennifer Taber is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Kent State University and studies risk perception.

She says based on previous research, people may not want to wear masks because they think their risk level of contracting COVID is lower now, especially in people who have been vaccinated.

Taber on the COVID risk level

“They don’t think it’s very likely that they will catch COVID, or they think that if they do, it won’t be that bad,” Taber said. “And probably for unvaccinated people, the thought process could be similar.”

Taber says unvaccinated people might perceive the vaccine to have a higher level of risk than COVID due to mistrust of government and pharmaceuticals.

Gov. Mike DeWine and other officials are urging people to put the masks back on, but it is unclear how effective these recommendations are.

John Updegraff, also from the Kent State Department of Psychology, says social norms have affected the wearing of masks in communities, dating back to the start of the pandemic.

Updegraff on people influencing people

“People are generally more likely to do things that they see others doing, and they know other people are advocating for doing it,” Updegraff said.

Updegraff says people become more comfortable with wearing masks when it’s a requirement rather than a personal choice.

On the other hand, the masks becoming obligatory could trigger the phenomenon of psychological reactance. It is then that someone does the opposite of what they are told because they feel that their freedom of choice is threatened.


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Here’s how consumer behavior is influenced by social norms http://kenafsociety.org/heres-how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/ http://kenafsociety.org/heres-how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 07:14:28 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/heres-how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/

A meta-analysis of existing research on social norms, aimed at establishing several new empirical generalizations, was recently carried out by researchers at the University Carlos III of Madrid, HEC Montreal, and the University of New South Wales. , UNSW Sydney.

The study, published in the Journal of Marketing, titled “The Influence of Social Norms on Consumer Behavior: A Meta-Analysis” was written by Vladimir Melnyk, François A. Carrillat and Valentyna Melnyk.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in several new behaviors that health experts want to discourage, such as reusing the same mask, as it is harmful to society.

The good news is that social norms, which consist in communicating what others are doing (ex: “2/3 of people avoid reusing the same mask”) or what to do (ex, “do not reusing the same mask is essential “), are the most useful in preventing people from adopting these behaviors. Defined by researchers as “rules and norms which are understood by members of a group and which guide and / or constrain social behavior without the force of laws”, social norms influence various forms of daily consumption, including food choices, responses to new products, and loyalty.

For example, signs in a hotel stating that other hotel guests are reusing their towels increases towel reuse. Social norms are often exploited by traders and policy makers to encourage a variety of socially approved behaviors, such as conserving energy, complying with product recalls, and paying taxes. They are also used to discourage socially frowned upon behaviors, such as environmental pollution, smoking, and excessive alcohol or drug use. In this study, researchers clarify the effects of social norms for a wide range of consumption behaviors and detail how practitioners and government officials can use actionable moderators, such as the use of appropriate communication elements for certain behaviors, countries and consumers.

This should improve the success of these policies and recommendations, which has been mixed to date. They also discover how cultural differences can determine the effects of social norms on socially approved and disapproved behaviors.

Communication strategies for marketers:

The content of communications should present descriptive rather than invasive forms of social norms (i.e. describing what (most) people actually do rather than what they should be doing). Vladimir Melnyk adds that “We also recommend that marketers avoid specifying explicit sanctions and rewards associated with social norms. Instead, strategies that highlight the benefits to others or the consumer’s freedom, such as communicating with a postscript that says “it’s your decision”, can lessen resistance and thus be more effective. to induce the target behavior. ”Practitioners may worry about highlighting a specific organization when communicating about social norms, but findings suggest that referring to a specific company, government agency, or NGO may make more influential social norms communications.

Social norms are also more powerful when they cite people perceived to be close to target consumers. In contrast, the results indicate that references to authority figures do not reinforce the influence of social norms on consumer behavior. When communicating standards, marketers can recognize the monetary costs associated with targeted behaviors. François Carrillat explains that “although this is a financial barrier, monetary costs also appear to increase the desirability of behavior, so social norms can be particularly effective in promoting costly behaviors like giving or giving away. purchase of organic food (more expensive). Moreover, social standards are also effective regardless of the effort required and the time invested to comply.

Cultural differences between countries:

The impact of social norms on socially disapproved behaviors varies considerably by country of implementation, but it is stable across countries for socially approved behaviors.

Social norms have a weaker influence on socially disapproved behaviors in countries where religion is less important, which value variety and self-expression, and where people are more free to make choices for themselves ( i.e. most western countries).

These findings have important implications for public health when group behavior is essential. To encourage mask-wearing in most Western countries, for example, public officials need to communicate that mask-wearing is socially approved behavior that other relatives adopt.

In most developing countries, communications should stress that not wearing a mask is socially frowned upon. “These findings provide information to marketers and policy makers by identifying effective strategies, and some commonly used but ineffective, to improve the impact of social norms on consumer behavior,” says Valentyna Melnyk.

The results also suggest that the influence of social norms may prompt private acceptance. Thus, this research can help marketers and policy makers leverage social norms to encourage private and public behavior.

This story was posted from an agency feed with no text editing. Only the title has been changed.


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Study shows how consumer behavior is influenced by social norms http://kenafsociety.org/study-shows-how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/ http://kenafsociety.org/study-shows-how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/study-shows-how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/



ANI |
Update:
09 Aug 2021 17:59 STI

Washington [US], August 9 (ANI): A meta-analysis of existing research on social norms, aimed at establishing several new empirical generalizations, was recently carried out by researchers at the University Carlos III de Madrid, HEC Montréal and the University from New South Wales, UNSW Sydney.
The study, published in the Journal of Marketing, titled “The Influence of Social Norms on Consumer Behavior: A Meta-Analysis” was written by Vladimir Melnyk, François A. Carrillat and Valentyna Melnyk.
The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in several new behaviors that health experts want to discourage, such as reusing the same mask, as it is harmful to society.
The good news is that social norms, which consist in communicating what others are doing (ex: “2/3 of people avoid reusing the same mask”) or what to do (ex, “do not reusing the same mask is essential “), are the most useful in preventing people from adopting these behaviors.

Defined by researchers as “rules and norms which are understood by members of a group and which guide and / or constrain social behavior without the force of laws”, social norms influence various forms of daily consumption, including food choices, responses to new products, and loyalty.
For example, signs in a hotel stating that other hotel guests are reusing their towels increases towel reuse. Social norms are often exploited by traders and policy makers to encourage a variety of socially approved behaviors, such as conserving energy, complying with product recalls, and paying taxes. They are also used to discourage socially frowned upon behaviors, such as environmental pollution, smoking, and excessive alcohol or drug use.

In this study, researchers clarify the effects of social norms for a wide range of consumption behaviors and detail how practitioners and government officials can use actionable moderators, such as the use of appropriate communication elements for certain behaviors, countries and consumers.
This should improve the success of these policies and recommendations, which has been mixed to date. They also discover how cultural differences can determine the effects of social norms on socially approved and disapproved behaviors.
Communication strategies for marketers:
The content of communications should present descriptive rather than invasive forms of social norms (i.e. describing what (most) people actually do rather than what they should be doing). Vladimir Melnyk adds that “We also recommend that marketers avoid specifying explicit sanctions and rewards associated with social norms. Instead, strategies that highlight the benefits to others or the consumer’s freedom, such as communicating with a postscript that says “it’s your decision”, can lessen resistance and thus be more effective. to induce the target behavior. “

Practitioners may worry about highlighting a specific organization when communicating about social norms, but findings suggest that referring to a specific company, government agency, or NGO may make communications about social norms more influential. .
Social norms are also more powerful when they cite people perceived to be close to target consumers. In contrast, the results indicate that references to authority figures do not reinforce the influence of social norms on consumer behavior.

When communicating standards, marketers can recognize the monetary costs associated with targeted behaviors. François Carrillat explains that “although this is a financial barrier, monetary costs also appear to increase the desirability of behavior, so social norms can be particularly effective in promoting expensive behaviors like giving or giving away. purchase of organic food (more expensive). Moreover, social standards are also effective regardless of the effort required and the time invested to comply.
Cultural differences between countries:
The impact of social norms on socially disapproved behaviors varies considerably by country of implementation, but it is stable across countries for socially approved behaviors.
Social norms have a weaker influence on socially disapproved behaviors in countries where religion is less important, which value variety and self-expression, and where people are more free to make choices for themselves ( i.e. most western countries).
These findings have important implications for public health when group behavior is essential. To encourage mask-wearing in most Western countries, for example, public officials should communicate that mask-wearing is socially approved behavior that other relatives adopt.
In most developing countries, communications should stress that not wearing a mask is socially frowned upon.

“These findings provide information to marketers and policy makers by identifying effective strategies, and some commonly used but ineffective, to improve the impact of social norms on consumer behavior,” says Valentyna Melnyk.
The results also suggest that the influence of social norms may prompt private acceptance. Thus, this research can help marketers and policy makers leverage social norms to encourage private and public behavior. (ANI)


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How consumer behavior is influenced by social norms http://kenafsociety.org/how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/ http://kenafsociety.org/how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/how-consumer-behavior-is-influenced-by-social-norms/

Washington [US], August 9 (ANI): A meta-analysis of existing research on social norms, aimed at establishing several new empirical generalizations, was recently carried out by researchers at the University Carlos III de Madrid, HEC Montréal and the University from New South Wales, UNSW Sydney.

The study, published in the Journal of Marketing, titled “The Influence of Social Norms on Consumer Behavior: A Meta-Analysis” was written by Vladimir Melnyk, François A. Carrillat and Valentyna Melnyk.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in several new behaviors that health experts want to discourage, such as reusing the same mask, as it is harmful to society.

The good news is that social norms, which consist in communicating what others are doing (ex: “2/3 of people avoid reusing the same mask”) or what to do (ex, “do not reusing the same mask is essential “), are the most useful in preventing people from adopting these behaviors. Defined by researchers as “rules and norms which are understood by members of a group and which guide and / or constrain social behavior without the force of laws”, social norms influence various forms of daily consumption, including food choices, responses to new products, and loyalty.

For example, signs in a hotel stating that other hotel guests are reusing their towels increases towel reuse. Social norms are often exploited by traders and policy makers to encourage a variety of socially approved behaviors, such as conserving energy, complying with product recalls, and paying taxes. They are also used to discourage socially frowned upon behaviors, such as environmental pollution, smoking, and excessive alcohol or drug use. In this study, researchers clarify the effects of social norms for a wide range of consumption behaviors and detail how practitioners and government officials can use actionable moderators, such as the use of appropriate communication elements for certain behaviors, countries and consumers.

This should improve the success of these policies and recommendations, which has been mixed to date. They also discover how cultural differences can determine the effects of social norms on socially approved and disapproved behaviors.

The content of communications should present descriptive rather than invasive forms of social norms (i.e. describing what (most) people actually do rather than what they should be doing). Vladimir Melnyk adds that “We also recommend that marketers avoid specifying explicit sanctions and rewards associated with social norms. Instead, strategies that highlight the benefits to others or the consumer’s freedom, such as communicating with a postscript that says “it’s your decision”, can lessen resistance and thus be more effective. to induce the target behavior. ”Practitioners may worry about highlighting a specific organization when communicating about social norms, but findings suggest that referring to a specific company, government agency, or NGO may make more influential social norms communications.

Social norms are also more powerful when they cite people perceived to be close to target consumers. In contrast, the results indicate that references to authority figures do not reinforce the influence of social norms on consumer behavior. When communicating standards, marketers can recognize the monetary costs associated with targeted behaviors. François Carrillat explains that “although this is a financial barrier, monetary costs also appear to increase the desirability of behavior, so social norms can be particularly effective in promoting expensive behaviors like giving or giving away. purchase of organic food (more expensive). Moreover, social standards are also effective regardless of the effort required and the time invested to comply.

Social norms have a weaker influence on socially disapproved behaviors in countries where religion is less important, which value variety and self-expression, and where people are more free to make choices for themselves ( i.e. most western countries).

These findings have important implications for public health when group behavior is essential. To encourage mask-wearing in most Western countries, for example, public officials should communicate that mask-wearing is socially approved behavior that other relatives adopt.

In most developing countries, communications should stress that not wearing a mask is socially frowned upon. “These findings provide information to marketers and policy makers by identifying effective strategies, and some commonly used but ineffective, to improve the impact of social norms on consumer behavior,” says Valentyna Melnyk.

The results also suggest that the influence of social norms may prompt private acceptance. Thus, this research can help marketers and policy makers leverage social norms to encourage private and public behavior. (ANI)


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Forget Being Normal – Why Social Norms Are Supposed To Be Broken http://kenafsociety.org/forget-being-normal-why-social-norms-are-supposed-to-be-broken/ http://kenafsociety.org/forget-being-normal-why-social-norms-are-supposed-to-be-broken/#respond Thu, 05 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/forget-being-normal-why-social-norms-are-supposed-to-be-broken/

To be successful in life, you have to step out of your box, out of your comfort zone. If you stay a recluse, then you will never accomplish what you want (unless you want to be a recluse, of course).

You might be worried that you might stand out in public, that you might not really be seen as “normal,” but that’s what is supposed to happen.

You are meant to stand out and societal norms are meant to be shattered to make room for progress.

RELATED: 25 Sassy Quotes About Strength For Any Time You Don’t Fuck In And Want To Regain Your Independence

Progress requires change, and change means disrupting the norm.

You should never blindly follow social norms just because you think you should. You should question them.

Ask yourself Why your home should be immaculate when entertaining guests.

Wonder Why you celebrate holidays like Christmas, Easter and Halloween. Find out the real reasons you do the things you do, and you might be surprised at how many things you do just out of habit or out of social expectation.

For example, you might find that you only go to church on holidays because you always did when growing up.

Or maybe you find out that the real reason we celebrate Halloween isn’t for you.