Social norms – Kenaf Society http://kenafsociety.org/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://kenafsociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Social norms – Kenaf Society http://kenafsociety.org/ 32 32 Pressure to conform to social norms may explain risky COVID-19 decisions http://kenafsociety.org/pressure-to-conform-to-social-norms-may-explain-risky-covid-19-decisions/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/pressure-to-conform-to-social-norms-may-explain-risky-covid-19-decisions/

The pandemic has entered a murky phase and social norms are changing rapidly, which I’ve been thinking a lot about lately. Many people test at home, or not at all. Here in Vermont, where I live, you can get a type of PCR test that can be done at home. But state officials here and abroad are no longer carefully monitoring the results of those tests, meaning the true spread of the coronavirus in the U.S. population remains unclear (SN: 04/22/22).

For the past few weeks, rumors of a stealth wave of COVID-19 have been circulating both in the media and on my Twitter feed. Now cases and hospitalizations are rising, as are levels of coronavirus in sewage. This suggests that more cases, and ultimately deaths, could follow.

Even with increasing workloads and a vaccination rate which has stagnated at around 66% of the eligible population, the American public has largely begun to emerge from the COVID-19 crisis. People are getting rid of their masks, eating out, going to concerts, traveling to remote places, having big weddings indoors and doing all the social things people tend to do when left at home. themselves.

The 2,600 people White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner the end of last month is a good example. Just like host Trevor Noah prophesiedmany in attendance have since tested positive for COVID-19, including US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and reporters from NBC, ABC, the Washington Post, Politico and other media. And those who almost certainly knew better – flag the White House coronavirus response coordinator Ashish Jha – nonetheless made an appearance.

A myriad of human behavioral quirks undoubtedly underlie these arguably poor choices. The Decision Lab website contains a list of biases and mental shortcuts people use to make decisions. The one that caught my eye was social norms. This particular quirk describes behaviors that people deem appropriate in a given situation.

I started thinking about social norms by writing an article about how to get people in the United States to eat less meat when the practice is so, well, normal (SN: 5/11/22). Social norms, my research has informed me, vary depending on the group one hangs out with and their environment. “We quickly change our point of view depending on the context of the situation we find ourselves in,” writes marketing expert John Laurence on the Decision Lab site.

I might have found this fast switching idea suspicious if I hadn’t recently experienced the phenomenon. My husband’s Disney-phile brother and his wife had been planning a family reunion at Disney World in Florida since the pandemic began. And I, some kind of curmudgeon reluctant to feel magic, long ago agreed to go on the condition that other people do all the planning. And so it was, after multiple COVID-related postponements, that my kids, husband, and I landed in Orlando on a blisteringly hot April day.

Normal Disney, I soon learned, bore little resemblance to normal Vermont. It was evident from people’s attire. All around me, parents and children dressed in coordinated outfits and matching Mickey Mouse ears. (My apologies to my kids – your mom missed the fashion memo.)

Social norms almost certainly arose to foster cohesion among our earliest ancestors, who needed solidarity to hunt large prey, share limited resources, and ward off predators and enemy tribes. Intra-group norms also provide humans with a sense of belonging, which research shows is vital to our overall health. A meta-analysis of over 3.4 million people followed for an average of seven years showed that the likelihood of dying during the study period increased by 26% for participants who reported feeling lonely (SN: 03/29/20).

It is therefore not surprising that one of the most powerful drivers of human behavior is the search for belonging. At Disney, that quest means blocking out the reality that exists just outside the fiefdom. Wars, climatic crises, political fights and others have no place in these magical walls. Nor are reminders of a global health crisis which, according to the latest estimates from the World Health Organization, has so far killed nearly 15 million people global.

Within the walls of Disney, crowds of mostly tourists without masks packed on iconic rides and in restaurants. Halfway through our trip, a judge in Florida ruled that masks could not be required on public transportation, no masks should be seen on buses carrying people to the Magic Kingdom and the Epcot Center. And everywhere, all the time, people seemed to be coughing, sniffling, or blowing their noses.

As a science journalist covering COVID-19, I certainly knew I had to keep my mask on. And yet, my resolve quickly faltered. My kids commented that no one else was masking up, not even my parents who usually followed the rules. Putting on my mask meant confessing that I didn’t revel in sparkle, glitter and magic and making it all too obvious to my beloved extended family that I didn’t, in fact, belong. I kept my face covering in my pocket.

Humans’ drive for conformity isn’t all bad. In a now classic study from the 1980s, researchers sought to reduce water use in drought-prone California. Signs at the University of California, Santa Cruz asking students to turn off the shower while soaping up only led to 6% compliance. The researchers therefore recruited male students to serve as standard-setting role models. These models hung out in the communal shower until they heard another student come in, then soaped up without water. When a model soaped up without a shower, roughly half of the involuntary students have also started turning off their taps when soaping. Compliance jumped to 67% when two models followed the panel.

But conformity can also distort the way we make decisions. For example, in the summer of 2020, when the pandemic was still new, researchers asked 23,000 people in Mexico to predict how a fictional woman named Mariana would decide whether or not to attend a birthday party. Most attendees thought Mariana should not attend. But when they read a sentence suggesting that their friends would attend or that others approved of the party, their predictions that Mariana would also go increased by 25%, according to researchers PLOS ONE.

My decision to conform to Disney normal ended predictably – with a positive COVID-19 test. After weeks of coughing and sleepless nights, however, my frustration is directed less at myself than at the political leaders who so blithely ignore both epidemiology and human behavior research and tell us to live as if it was in 2019. It is not. It’s not 2020 or 2021 either. It’s the murky year known as 2022. And the rules of behavior that reinforce our social norms – such as models who refrain from large indoor unmasked gatherings and leaders who uphold mask mandates on public transit to protect the most vulnerable — should reflect that liminal space.

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Partnership for change: UN Women engages traditional leaders to transform social norms http://kenafsociety.org/partnership-for-change-un-women-engages-traditional-leaders-to-transform-social-norms/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 18:09:56 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/partnership-for-change-un-women-engages-traditional-leaders-to-transform-social-norms/

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UN Women in Africa led efforts to engage with cultural and traditional community leaders to end harmful practices affecting women and girls. Evidence-based engagement has proven that working with community leaders is essential to effectively changing social norms.

Traditional leaders have been catalysts of change against child marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM) by influencing the abandonment of certain customary and traditional laws and practices and engaging with their communities to end them.

At least one in three young women in Africa is married before the age of 18 (UNICEF, 2006). Although there are signs of slight progress in changing attitudes towards FGM, the practice remains a major problem in many countries on the continent. Approximately 200 million girls and women have been subjected to this practice (UNICEF, 2006).

Traditional leaders across Africa play an important role as influencers and guardians of cultural practices within communities. As attention grows on the slow progress to end gender-based violence, including child early marriage (ECM) and FGM, traditional leaders have a critical role to play in changing deeply rooted cultural beliefs that perpetuate harmful practices.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of UN Women – Africa.

This press release was issued by APO. Content is not vetted by the African Business editorial team and none of the content has been verified or validated by our editorial teams, proofreaders or fact checkers. The issuer is solely responsible for the content of this announcement.

]]> UN Women engages traditional leaders to transform social norms http://kenafsociety.org/un-women-engages-traditional-leaders-to-transform-social-norms/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/un-women-engages-traditional-leaders-to-transform-social-norms/

UN Women in Africa led efforts to engage with cultural and traditional community leaders to end harmful practices affecting women and girls. Evidence-based engagement has proven that working with community leaders is essential to effectively changing social norms.

Traditional leaders have been catalysts of change against child marriage and female genital mutilation (FGM) by influencing the abandonment of certain customary and traditional laws and practices and engaging with their communities to end them.

At least one in three young women in Africa is married before the age of 18 (UNICEF, 2006). Although there are signs of slight progress in changing attitudes towards FGM, the practice remains a major problem in many countries on the continent. Approximately 200 million girls and women have been subjected to this practice (UNICEF, 2006).

Traditional leaders across Africa play an important role as influencers and guardians of cultural practices within communities. As attention grows on the slow progress to end gender-based violence, including child early marriage (ECM) and FGM, traditional leaders have a critical role to play in changing deeply rooted cultural beliefs that perpetuate harmful practices. Distributed by APO Group on behalf of UN Women – Africa.

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Costume studies students capture how women in 1896 challenged social norms through clothing – Dal News http://kenafsociety.org/costume-studies-students-capture-how-women-in-1896-challenged-social-norms-through-clothing-dal-news/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 14:14:46 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/costume-studies-students-capture-how-women-in-1896-challenged-social-norms-through-clothing-dal-news/

Costume studies students from Dal’s Fountain School of Performing Arts transported attendees to last week’s historic showcase in 1896.

‘Property and Protest’, held last Wednesday at the Sir James Dunn Theater, presented an image of a time in history when women began to wear clothes that went against the norms of status. what.

Perin Westerhof Nyman, instructor of the historical dress course at Dal, narrated the showcase as the students took to the stage in their creations. The final pieces were the culmination of their time in the apprenticeship program of intricate tailoring, tailoring, historical dress and costume design.

“Our program covers a variety of costume types and we do a lot of work that is theatre-oriented,” says Perin. “We make costumes for Dal productions, and a lot of our students go on to film, but there’s also this very strong historical element.”

The Historic Dress Showcase is an annual event open to the public that takes place at the end of each winter term.

Stuffy and proper? Nope

Daphnée St. Jacques has recreated an intricately hand-embroidered dress she found at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. While communicating with MET curators, she embroidered and dyed each flower on the floral panels on the front of the garment to best match the original dress.

“It took me about 120 hours and only half was the embroidery,” says Daphnée, pictured left in the dress. “Normally you buy silk ribbons and they would be woven with different colors, but because of time and money I ended up buying polyester ribbons and using alcohol markers to dye each of the ribbons .”

Daphne says her dress fits the theme of propriety and protest.

“We always imagined previous eras as being primitive and appropriate and following these codes. There have always been people who have broken these codes and broken these rules, she says. “My personal favorite thing to do when I’m wearing this type of dress is to do silly stuff like squat and act as unwomanly as possible just because I can.”

From women’s suffrage to the New Woman

Lilian Gibson, left, made a purple silk taffeta dress inspired by the women’s suffrage movement. It was based on a formal dress from the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney, Australia. Lilian made all of the roses in her hat “meticulously” by hand from the same fabric as the dress.

Jordan Chambers, left, created a black and white woolen ice skating costume based on a design from an 1896 issue of The delineator, an American women’s monthly published in New York. This type of clothing design allowed women to participate warmly on the ice. The horizontal lines of the dress trim were designed to provide support, keeping the hem away from the skates.

Hannah Plater, left, created a mountaineering outfit to show what a Victorian woman might wear for a mountain hike. The outfit would have been considered quite versatile and functional for climbing and hiking. The woolen fabric she used would also have kept the wearer dry and warm, even if it were to rain during the trek.

Chiara Power, on the left, recreated a blue and brown bloomer costume based on a garment from the Kyoto Costume Institute. It is a combination intended for cycling. In 1896 it would have been considered risky for a woman to wear it and according to the window display “bloomers were associated with the ‘new woman’, a symbol of social change which evoked both excitement and fear of society”.

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Female labor | India Inc: How India Inc can help change social norms that prevent women from working http://kenafsociety.org/female-labor-india-inc-how-india-inc-can-help-change-social-norms-that-prevent-women-from-working/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 17:26:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/female-labor-india-inc-how-india-inc-can-help-change-social-norms-that-prevent-women-from-working/ Horror of horrors, Saudi women now have a much higher labor force participation rate than Indian women. In recent years, Saudi Arabia has implemented a series of reforms aimed at reducing gender discrimination, which has led to a large number of women, in all age groups, entering the labor force. Published data shows that the participation of Saudi women in the labor market has increased from 18% in 2016 to 33% in 2020.

Meanwhile, in India, women’s participation in the labor market is plummeting. According to government data, it has fallen from 31% in 2012 to 21% in 2021. Other data sources, such as the Center for Indian Economic Monitoring (CMIE), give a much lower statistic of 11 to 12%.

Alas, no one is losing sleep over the low and declining labor force participation rate of Indian women. India has not experienced reforms on this front similar to those of Saudi Arabia. Women’s employment is not included in the Indian government’s aatmanirbharta agenda, nor in transforming India into a $5 trillion economy, nor in earlier slogans such as India Shining.

It is tempting to conclude from these data that gender norms are deteriorating and that years of very strong economic growth have not opened up economic opportunities for Indian women. During recent field visits, I found that the reality was more complicated due to a large number of factors. These factors had less to do with the market than with cultural and societal norms that do not pride themselves on female employment and the interaction of these norms with caste divisions and increasing levels of seasonal migration.

Two months ago I visited villages in Uttar Pradesh and Haryana and asked several women’s groups why female participation in the labor market is low and declining in India rural. In a Dalit village in Badhoi district in eastern UP, a women’s group cited sexual harassment by upper-caste men as the main cause of women’s withdrawal from the labor force. “Sexual harassment was common and accepted by our ancestors. No more. We refuse to work for them, one woman said angrily. Clearly, for this group, withdrawal from the workforce has helped end the generational exploitation and harassment of upper-caste men.

Veiled Attack

Another woman – holding a smartphone and hiding her face in her ghoonghat – dismissed my concerns with the following response: “There is a lot of work at home”. We don’t have time to go to work. To which the women around her retorted: “Her husband sends her enough from town that she doesn’t need to work. The woman in the ghoonghat simply smiled.

An activist, who came from Puna, an important destination for UP migrant workers, explained things to me. When the whole family migrates, women, men and their children, they all work in the factories of the city. But if only the male member of the family migrates, the women left behind prefer to leave the labor market. Perhaps they feel more insecure and vulnerable without their husbands. Here too, the withdrawal of women suggests an escape from exploitation.

Another villager added that the biradari (community) does not respect households where women work outside. People are reluctant to marry off their sons or daughters to families where the women go to work. When asked if they would like their daughters to go to school or college, most people said yes. But what is the use of such an education, if they are not going to work? Education improves the possibility of marriage, is the answer. No one wants to marry off their sons to illiterate daughters.

In a village in the district of Mirzapur, I met a group of young girls, aged between 16 and 25, who had been in contact with an NGO and aspired to be independent. One girl in the group said, “You have no idea how much pressure we are under from our families. We have to fight with our families to attend meetings like this and discuss our future work prospects. Another added: “We are under constant pressure to get married. Once married, we are in a hurry to have children. If there are no children within a year of marriage, parents and in-laws begin to worry that something is wrong with the marriage.

A girl from the group said, “Time is running out for us. If we don’t get a job within a certain time, our parents will marry us off and that would be the end of our career. These young girls did not fear discrimination in the workplace. They faced a much bigger challenge – age-old cultural norms that don’t approve of working women.

Minions with reviews

My travels then took me to a village in Haryana, where I met a group of about 25 girls who worked as krishi sathis (village companions) in a pesticide company training farmers in new technologies. Their ages, like the Mirzapur girls, ranged from 18 to 25. Many worked while attending college part-time. Many were married and four of them earned more than their husbands. “It’s really nice when my father-in-law asks me for advice on important household decisions, such as major purchases and future investments,” one said. His mother and stepmother weren’t given as much respect.

The pesticide company hired only women for this job. Such gender sensitivity is rare. Companies can play a role in changing social norms. But it will take a long time.

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Social norms on FGM in Egypt still prevail despite legislation: Study – Society – Egypt http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-on-fgm-in-egypt-still-prevail-despite-legislation-study-society-egypt/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-on-fgm-in-egypt-still-prevail-despite-legislation-study-society-egypt/

The study, which covered the country’s legal and policy efforts to combat FGM from 1928 to 2020, concluded that although various laws have curbed the practice, they have not deterred people from continuing to practice. practice them on a large scale.

Citing a UNICEF report, the study noted that the prevalence of FGM among Egyptian women recorded 97% in 2000, decreased to 92% and 87% in 2015 and 2016, respectively, but increased to 91% in 2017.

Despite the first official step against the practice in the 1950s, “the hoped-for change has not yet been achieved”, noted Mai Aglan, director of the EYC’s research and studies unit, in the study.

The EYC study pointed out that the country first acted against the practice in 1959 when the Egyptian Ministry of Health issued a decree banning the operation in its units nationwide.

Several laws and decrees have been adopted following pressure from popular organizations and civil society following the death of girls who are victims of this practice, the study points out.

In 2008, Egypt passed a law making the practice a crime and prescribing a prison sentence of at least three months and at most two years and a fine ranging from EGP 1,000 to EGP 5,000 for anyone who practices female circumcision.

The EYC study said the decision to fully criminalize FGM came in response to the death of a girl who was subjected to FGM in Minya in Upper Egypt a year earlier.

In the years that followed, the government amended the law several times to toughen penalties against those involved in the practice.

The EYC said that after the issue resurfaced in 2016 with news of the death of a young girl from Suez’s cabinet, the government enacted even harsher sanctions.

The 2016 amendments redefined FGM as a felony rather than a misdemeanor and increased the prison sentence from 5 to 7 years for anyone performing the operation for non-medical reasons.

In addition, a 15-year prison sentence has been provided for in the event that FGM results in the victim’s death or permanent deformity.

The amendments also punish family members or anyone who accompanies girls to undergo FGM with one to three years in prison.

The legislature recognized the crime as the partial or complete removal of the external genitalia and causing injury to those organs without medical necessity.

In 2021, the government toughened the penalty against FGM, with non-medical people involved in the practice of genital mutilation facing prison sentences for a period of at least seven years in prison if permanently incapacitated and at least least 10 years if the act results in death.

The most recent amendments to the law stipulated that medical professionals such as doctors and nurses who are found guilty of performing FGM face a sentence of up to 20 years in prison.

The amendment also stated that medical professionals who perform female genital mutilation could face between 10 and 15 years in prison.

If the procedure leads to permanent incapacitation, the medical professionals involved face a minimum of 10 years in prison, and if the procedure leads to death, the sentence will be increased to between 15 and 20 years in prison.

In addition, medical professionals found guilty of performing FGM will be denied licenses to practice their profession for up to five years and will have their clinics closed for the same period.

Under the 2021 amendments, anyone else found promoting, encouraging or supporting FGM will be imprisoned, even if the procedure was performed without causing harm.

Despite ongoing legislative efforts, EYC research has concluded that the laws themselves do not prevent parents from circumcising their daughters despite tougher penalties.

The penalty introduced against parents who seek to mutilate their daughters does not prevent the practice so much as it leads to people’s reluctance to report the crime for fear of punishment that can destroy families, the study adds.

The EYC noted that societal pressure to prevent the practice dissipates after the passing of the laws due to the lack of awareness programs and campaigns, especially in rural areas, which needed to go hand in hand with the legislation. .

The study found that treating the act as “a mere harmful practice” minimizes its real harm and consequences and fails to take into account that those who cling to tradition tie their attitude to reasons related to chastity and to religious beliefs.

Recommendations

The study called for tackling societal pressures, traditions and beliefs attributed to religion as well as misunderstandings resulting from lack of education.

He also urged Egypt to reframe the issue of FGM within the framework of children’s human rights and physical safety, as well as to rebuild trust between the government and civil society organizations to restore the cooperation on this issue.

The study also called for focusing awareness-raising activities against FGM on men and ending the existing perception that links norms of masculinity to the practice of cutting.

He also urged providing comprehensive education in schools to help young people understand the functions of the reproductive system and correct misconceptions about sexual desire and morals.

The study highlighted the need to design training programs for clerics to unify their terms in their thinking on the matter.

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The Integrity Conference: Building Positive Social Norms and Right Behaviors in Nigeria http://kenafsociety.org/the-integrity-conference-building-positive-social-norms-and-right-behaviors-in-nigeria/ Fri, 08 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/the-integrity-conference-building-positive-social-norms-and-right-behaviors-in-nigeria/

By Odeh Friday

A worrying lack of integrity and accountability within society has led to many being left behind in governance and decision-making processes. We’ve all seen some of the symptoms, too – a shattered public trust that often leaves citizens hopeless.

Many would say that Nigerians have misplaced their moral compass, drifting away from the principles we associate with excellence – professionalism, responsibility, accountability and self-realization. But while we struggle to find those role models among us who truly promote integrity in their words and deeds, at home and at work, at Accountability Lab – and I’m sure in many other organizations as well – we found that they do exist.

The beauty of some of this grim news is that it presents us with incredible opportunities for change. We know that if we give the right people the right opportunities, we can easily present real models of public service that can help drive a reform agenda around the values ​​and ethics that we need in the Nigerian public service.

However, it is useful to know what we are dealing with. Unethical practices and the cost of corruption in procurement/contracting processes and service delivery have resulted in the loss of billions of dollars. RAbout NGN675 billion was paid in cash bribes to public officials in Nigeria in 2019: Nigerians who pay bribes spend an average of ₦28,200 per year on bribes.

The 2019 audit report, meanwhile, shows the extent of unchecked abuse of Nigerian authority in financial processes, with around 9 MDAs spending around N49 billion without an appropriation from the National Assembly.

Embezzlement, bribery and electoral fraud remain huge forms of corrupt practices in Nigeria on a daily basis. Vote buying, which is not fundamentally new in Nigerian electoral politics, has become commonplace. One of the most essential ingredients of Nigerian democracy is now a challenge to democratic governance.

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In April 2020, Nigeria received $3.4 billion in emergency financial assistance from the IMF to support its response to COVID-19. The findings of the Public Procurement Office show that the federal ministry health had spent $96,000 (over 40 million naira) on 1,808 regular face masks.

Even young people who are offered to advance fee fraud (like Yahoo Yahoo) and get rich quick take up far too much media space as lifestyle role models in our society.

At different levels and with different administrations, the Nigerian government has tried to run programs to change behaviors and improve negative social norms – but the track record has been disappointing; 19 month old aggressive War on Indiscipline organized by the former military government with the aim of correcting social maladjustment; the “Good People Great Nation” legacy to rename Nigeria, which was considered inconclusive due to irresponsible leaders; to the faceless”Change starts with mecampaign that many leaders have mocked. Overall, none of them have worked to build a Nigeria where the citizens are faithful, loyal and honest.

The Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offenses Commission (ICPC) has developed the National Ethics and Integrity Policy which aims to address the many adverse effects of corruption in the public and private sectors while reinforcing moral values and integrity, but did not go beyond the intention as citizens are still unaware of the policy.

The discoveries of the Chatham House Africa Program Social Standards and Responsible Governance Project, show that a significant number of Nigerians – in many cases, 8 out of 10 Nigerians – believe that corruption is morally unacceptable, but that many Nigerians are unaware or mistaken about this moral rejection of corruption by their fellow citizens. This means that Nigeria is stuck in a social trap and collective action crisis where most citizens would like to live in a more honest society but fundamentally do not believe that their fellow citizens and leaders share this aspiration.

Today, we are here collectively to call on the government to put in place sustainable programs that encourage active citizen participation, support accountable leadership, and strengthen accountable institutions to integrate behavioral insights into anti-corruption strategies and using a social norms approach to tackling corruption as a means of reconstructing the Nigerian value system.

We have with us men and women who, through their lifestyle and their professional commitment, have proven that defending the virtues of integrity and responsibility is not an impossible task. They did and still do! We call them “Integrity Icons“. With the Integrity Conference (part of the Integrity Innovation Lab and the Integrity Icon campaign to name and celebrate honest government officials), we are having candid conversations to collectively create a course of action that will take us from personal integrity to building enduring institutional integrity.

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Strengthening institutional integrity will reduce systemic corruption in Nigeria, but this requires cross-sectoral cooperation and collaboration. The private sector and the public sector must cooperate with the common goal of strengthening accountability mechanisms, rewarding integrity and ensuring that governance systems are based on shared fundamental ethical values.

This is why we are committed to supporting private sector initiatives such as Ethics 1st, a unique initiative designed to advance corporate and business integrity among businesses in Nigeria. We encourage the public sector to leverage the benefits of technology and innovation in initiatives such as these to improve procurement transparency and foster integrity in the business environment.

In conclusion, we call on all Nigerians, including our political leaders, to rethink our value system. Our value system needs the collective efforts of government, the private sector, religious leaders, the media and other invested parties. to rebuild it. What we also need are creative efforts that experiment with original ideas and ensure a diverse range of voices around the table. We risk hampering our own development efforts if we do not work together to ensure that integrity is the norm in our society. We must change the narrative and come together to build a society with good values ​​that prioritize the public good over personal interests.

Thank you to our partners who work on behavior change at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Ford Foundationand Luminateas well as all Nigerian citizens.

Written by Odeh Friday, Accountability Lab Nigeria; with contributions from Leena Hoffmann, Chatham House and Lola Adekanye, Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE).

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Back to work: what are the social norms in offices today? http://kenafsociety.org/back-to-work-what-are-the-social-norms-in-offices-today/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 19:03:06 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/back-to-work-what-are-the-social-norms-in-offices-today/

TORONTO-


Shake hands. Drinking coffee with colleagues. Drink and eat customer. Social niceties once taken for granted look increasingly complicated as thousands of Canadian workers return to the office this spring, many for the first time in two years.


Along with anxiety about commute times and company vaccination policies, there are questions about what professional behavior will look like in 2022.


Travis O’Rourke, president of staffing firm Hays Canada, says employers will need to focus on making the return a positive, not dreaded experience, and deal with any potential issues that could make employees feel bad. easy.


“The back-to-office culture has to be at the top of every manager’s list, or they’ll find that their employees just won’t want to come back,” O’Rourke said in an interview.


He also says that the workplace culture will need to adapt to the changing needs of employees and reflect the evolution of society over the past two years.


Most Canadians say they don’t want to go back to work full time. According to a recent Amazon business survey, half of Canadian office workers say they would prefer to work mostly or completely remotely. The report also found that 43% of Canadians would likely look for a new job if their bosses forced them to return to the office full-time.


Signs of downtown life are picking up nonetheless. Toronto’s financial heart has become increasingly busy since major banks began calling back their employees. Manulife Financial Corp. authorized the return of staff on a voluntary basis from this week.


In other parts of the country, like Alberta — where nearly all COVID restrictions were lifted earlier this month — workers are also returning to downtown offices. According to commercial real estate firm Avison Young, which tracks daily activity estimates for representative office occupants in North American cities, foot traffic in downtown Edmonton has increased week-over-week since the start of the year. Foot traffic is also up in Calgary, to its highest level in 2022 so far since the week ending March 13, according to Avison Young.


Will we feel comfortable with each other – shaking hands, sitting close to each other, talking without masks?


O’Rourke of Hays Canada thinks some employees will be nervous with their co-workers at first as they try to follow workplace health protocols, from masking to distancing to sanitizing, for their own safety while trying to navigate within their team’s comfort level. . But that should be short-lived.


“We find that once an employee is comfortable with the requirements, they start to feel a lot like before,” he said. “The other big driver is reading your colleagues – once you have an idea of ​​where everyone is on your team, it’s a lot easier to interact.”


For immunocompromised workers, O’Rourke sees accommodations and considerations made by team leaders, such as masking in tight spaces if necessary, and other workers doing their best to respect and protect their co-workers.


What about working lunches, after-work aperitifs and coffee meetings to network?


O’Rourke definitely sees a resumption of the social activities that were an integral part of the office experience before the pandemic.


“People want it,” he said. “The idea of ​​having another ‘party’ or social event remotely isn’t appealing.”


He expects to see many employers take advantage of these activities and outings as a way to bring people back to show them what they miss about working from home.


What about flexibility, especially for parents?


O’Rourke says companies are working to try to support a desire for more flexibility. Some of these features include flexible schedules to allow for pick-up or drop-off at school or daycare, personal days to accommodate family members’ schedules, and mental health resources to support employees going through a difficult time outside of work. Many companies are also looking for ways to subsidize child care or even have child care on site, he adds.


“In the war for talent, companies use all the tools they can afford,” he said.


Checking things out, he said, and this shouldn’t be a one-off conversation.


“Open and honest communication and dialogue is key, he said. “If your employees aren’t doing well, you have the choice of finding out at your own pace or finding out during an exit interview.”


What about the design of the desk itself?


Many offices have spaced desks, added barriers, upgraded doors and other elements to be touchless, etc., but that may not be enough, says Gale Moutrey, vice president of innovation at Steelcase. Steelcase is an office design solutions company that collaborated with furniture and service provider POI Business Interiors to open WorkBetterLab in Toronto, a prototype pop-up workplace giving people the opportunity to see what a hybrid office.


“We envision the office of the future as a neighborhood that creates the same energy and connection that people feel sitting in a sidewalk café or the same level of flow that they experience in their local library,” he said. said in an interview.


This concept includes a variety of interconnected space types that support a mix of uses – private places for productivity, places to collaborate with in-person or remote colleagues, spaces for socializing. One of the goals of this approach is to create equitable experiences and spaces that welcome those who work from home and in person.


“Today’s office must ‘earn’ the worker ride,” Moutrey said.


This report from The Canadian Press was first published on March 17, 2022.

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Social norms will take time to establish as more workers return to the office http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-will-take-time-to-establish-as-more-workers-return-to-the-office/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/social-norms-will-take-time-to-establish-as-more-workers-return-to-the-office/

Shake hands. Drinking coffee with colleagues. Drink and eat customer. Social niceties once taken for granted look increasingly complicated as thousands of Canadian workers return to the office this spring, many for the first time in two years.

Along with anxiety about commute times and corporate vaccination policies, there are questions about what professional behavior will look like in 2022.

Travis O’Rourke, president of staffing firm Hays Canada, says employers will need to focus on making the return a positive, not dreaded experience, and deal with any potential issues that could make employees feel bad. easy.

“The back-to-office culture has to be at the top of every manager’s list, or they’ll find that their employees just won’t want to come back,” O’Rourke said in an interview.

He also says that workplace culture will need to adapt to the changing needs of employees and reflect the evolution of society over the past two years.

Most Canadians say they don’t want to go back to work full time. According to a recent Amazon business survey, half of Canadian office workers say they would prefer to work mostly or completely remotely. The report also found that 43% of Canadians would likely look for a new job if their bosses forced them to return to the office full-time.

Signs of downtown life are picking up nonetheless. Toronto’s financial heart has become increasingly busy since major banks began calling back their employees. Manulife Financial Corp. authorized the return of staff on a voluntary basis from this week.

In other parts of the country, like Alberta — where nearly all COVID restrictions were lifted earlier this month — workers are also returning to downtown offices. According to commercial real estate firm Avison Young, which tracks daily activity estimates for representative office occupants in North American cities, foot traffic in downtown Edmonton has increased week-over-week since the start of the year. Foot traffic is also up in Calgary, to its highest level in 2022 so far since the week ending March 13, according to Avison Young.

Will we feel comfortable with each other – shaking hands, sitting close to each other, talking without masks?

O’Rourke of Hays Canada thinks some employees will be nervous with their co-workers at first as they try to follow workplace health protocols, from masking to distancing to sanitizing, for their own safety while trying to navigate within their team’s comfort level. . But that should be short-lived.

“We find that once an employee is comfortable with the requirements, they start to feel like they used to,” he said. “The other big driver is reading your colleagues – once you have an idea of ​​where everyone is on your team, it’s a lot easier to interact.”

For immunocompromised workers, O’Rourke sees accommodations and considerations made by team leaders, such as masking in tight spaces if necessary, and other workers doing their best to respect and protect their co-workers.

What about working lunches, after-work aperitifs and coffee meetings to network?

O’Rourke definitely sees a resumption of the social activities that were an integral part of the office experience before the pandemic.

“People want it,” he said. “The idea of ​​having another ‘party’ or social event remotely isn’t appealing.”

He expects to see many employers leverage these activities and outings as a way to bring people back to show them what they miss about working from home.

What about flexibility, especially for parents?

O’Rourke says companies are working to try to support a desire for more flexibility. Some of these features include flexible schedules to allow for pick-up or drop-off at school or daycare, personal days to accommodate family members’ schedules, and mental health resources to support employees going through a difficult time outside of work. Many companies are also looking for ways to subsidize child care or even have child care on site, he adds.

“In the war for talent, companies use all the tools they can afford,” he said.

Checking things out, he said, and this shouldn’t be a one-off conversation.

“Open and honest communication and dialogue is key, he said. “If your employees aren’t doing well, you have the choice of finding out at your own pace or finding out during an exit interview.”

What about the design of the desk itself?

Many offices have spaced desks, added barriers, upgraded doors and other elements to be touchless, etc., but that may not be enough, says Gale Moutrey, vice president of innovation at Steelcase. Steelcase is an office design solutions company that collaborated with furniture and service provider POI Business Interiors to open WorkBetterLab in Toronto, a prototype pop-up workplace giving people the opportunity to see what a hybrid office.

“We envision the office of the future as a neighborhood that creates the same energy and connection that people feel sitting in a sidewalk café or the same level of flow that they experience in their local library,” he said. said in an interview.

This concept includes a variety of interconnected space types that support a mix of uses – private places for productivity, places to collaborate with in-person or remote colleagues, spaces for socializing. One of the goals of this approach is to create equitable experiences and spaces that welcome those who work from home and in person.

“Today’s office must ‘earn’ the worker ride,” Moutrey said.

This report from The Canadian Press was first published on March 17, 2022.

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A Section of Now: Social Norms and Rituals as Sites of Architectural Intervention – Announcements http://kenafsociety.org/a-section-of-now-social-norms-and-rituals-as-sites-of-architectural-intervention-announcements/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 05:23:39 +0000 http://kenafsociety.org/a-section-of-now-social-norms-and-rituals-as-sites-of-architectural-intervention-announcements/

A section of now: social norms and rituals as sites of architectural intervention

Book launch: March 10, from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., online, with a conversation between Giovanna Borasi (Director of the CCA), Florian Idenburg (SO–IL) and Hilary Sample (MOS)

Canadian Center for Architecture

1920 rue Baile

Montreal Quebec H3H 2S6
Canada

Does your family fit into the standard family home?
What will you do if you live to be 100?
Do you know how you were made?
Are you the owner, tenant or subscriber of your home?
How many people are you willing to share a kitchen with?
Are you a conscious consumer?
Do you need a hustle for a living?
Are you ready to share your workplace with a robot?

These are some of the many questions that arise A section of now: social norms and rituals as sites of architectural interventionour new delivered and companion exposure (on view until May 1, 2022) resulting from the one-year survey catch up on life with which we explore the ability (or lack thereof) of architecture to evolve in dialogue with society.



A section of now urges architecture to begin to confront and address our altered and changing social norms. The publication serves as a meditation on new behaviors, rituals and values ​​and their spatial implications, and seeks to catalyze urban and architectural interventions that adapt, influence and, in some cases, anticipate our new lived realities. The authors address a range of topics that broaden understanding of our changing societal relationships – Jen Schradie examines the safety of digital spaces, Ann Neumann reflects on how normative life trajectories affect older people, and Nina Power focuses on many selves that each of us brings to the fore – as the architects share new take on the design brief: Sam Jacob presents a framework for spaces for blended families, Karla Rothstein proposes a space for voluntary euthanasia, and Mario Gooden questions the role of disputed monuments, among many others. Bringing together analytical essays on the contemporary moment and the direction in which society is moving, projective texts that describe new architectural types to meet the needs and aspirations of society, as well as television series, photographs and projects of architecture and design, A Section of Now sketches a new relationship between the spaces we live in and the ways we live in them.

A section of now is edited by Giovanna Borasi and co-published with Spector Books, with a selection of photographs curated by Melissa Harris and television series by Andrea Bellavitaand with texts by Agency—Agency, Mario Gooden, Helen Hester, Sam Jacob, Andrés Jaque, Joanne McNeil, Ann Neumann, Nina Power, Anna Puigjaner, Karla Rothstein, Hilary Sample, Jen Schradie, SO–IL, Traumnovelle, and Sumayya Vally.

Other contributors include: 2050+ and -orama; Christopher Anderson; Nicolas Asfouri, Assemble Studio; Space Technology Center; certain measures; Dan Chen; Office of Sam Chermayeff; Benson Chien and Samantha Ingallina; Aaron M. Cohen; Thadde Comar; joint accounts; Coop Himmelb(l)au; Studio Teddy Cruz+Fonna Forman and Kotti+Co; Degelo Architekten and Gamperle AG; Cynthia Deng and Arta Perezic; Jamie Diamond; DOGME and New Academy; Elena Dorfman; Widened design; Lucas Foglia; Edouard Francois House; The future market; Salwan Georges; Ginger Design Studio; Paul Graham; Michelle Groskopf; Max Hampshire, Paul Kolling and Paul Seidler; Ai Hasegawa; Go Hasegawa+Associates; Het Nieuwe Institute; HOME OFFICE; Marisa Morán Jahn and Rafi Segal; Dafyd Jones; Valerian Mazataud; June 14 Meyer-Grohbrügge & Chermayeff; Anais Langlais-Schmidt; LATENT Productions and GSAPP DeathLAB at Columbia University; Jesse The Rider; Lucy McRae; Mueller Sigrist Architekten; Christine Muschi; NHDM; Ewa Nowak; Brittany M. Powell; Alice Proujansky; Kamila Rudnicka; Nadia Sablin; Klemens Schillinger; Michael Schmelling; Jack Self; Popular Space; Giulia Spadafora; Special projects; Marie-Claire Springham; Stefan Marx; OFFICE Kersten Geers David Van Severen; other architects; Pollard Thomas Edwards; Republic of Estonia; rework ; Something fantastic; StrongArm technologies; Office of Takahashi Ippei; Teple Misto; earth0; Brian Thomas; Elizabeth Ubbe; Foolish ; Jonas Voigt, Philipp Schmitt and Stephan Bogner; Aubrey Wade; Christoph Wagner Architekten; Nick Waplington; Williamson Williamson; Hardy Wilson; Yangying Ye.

The book is designed by Studio Folder, and is also published in French under the title A portion of the present: social norms and rituals as sites of architectural intervention.

The CCA’s Year-Long Investigation catch up on life (2021-2022) manifested in the lecture series An extended family, which focuses on the relationship of architecture to the changing organization of the family in society; a collaboration with e-flux architecture on the new spatialities of work and inequalities, entitled Workplace; a thematic web number A social reset concerning the issue of alignment (or misalignment) between societal transformations and architectural transformations; a short documentary series in three parts, starting with What it takes to make a house in 2019, on the homeless, followed by When we live alonewhich explores the ways in which we live alone together in contemporary cities (public release April 2022), and concludes with a third, on the elderly, currently in production and to be published in 2023. These formats are in addition to the exhibition and its companion book, A section of now: social norms and rituals as sites of architectural intervention. We will soon be launching The possessiona social media pilot project, to explore how notions of ownership are constructed through legal and bureaucratic mechanisms.

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